The U.S. Justice Organization Awards Cynthia Joffrion

The U.S. Justice Organization Awards Cynthia Joffrion the Wellington Award

In 2009, the U.S. Justice Organization honored Cynthia Joffrion with its highest honor, given to a citizen "who at great personal sacrifice, has unselfishly served her community and the nation."

 

Potomac -- Free-Press-Release.com-- Apr 22, 2012 -- In 2009, the U.S. Justice Organization honored Cynthia Joffrion with its highest honor, given to a citizen "who at great personal sacrifice, has unselfishly served her community and the nation."

In 1998 Cynthia Joffrion became the Assistance Superintendent of Technology Services for the Yonkers Board of Education the 4th largest School System in the state of New York. In 1999 Joffrion went the Yonkers Office of the Inspector General with allegations concerning the school district's deal with both Compaq and Apple computers, in which the manufacturers sold computers in bundles of 10 and provided one or two extra units as an incentive. Joffrion alleged that the schools system superintendent told her to send the extra computers to his relatives, and threatened to fire her and her staff when she refused. "We basically did some preliminary investigation and referred it to the district attorney," Zisman said. "We thought the information was accurate. Joffrion recorded about 40 telephone and in-person conversations with the suspect. Before the issuance of search warrants in connection with the computers, the suspect was informed of the search by a friend so he could dispose of the evidence.

Joffrion continued to work undercover from 1999 to 2005. She was cooperating with the FBI, and authorities in December 2004 recorded her giving the suspect $1000. She agreed to make kickbacks of $144,000 under the direction of the FBI. She knew at that time that his role would certainly be revealed at trial, and that the eventual proceedings in court might damage her ability not only to be a public servant, but to work in any public service career. "By 2005, word of the investigation and Mrs. Joffrion’s cooperation had reached the news media. Determined to meet her duty as a cooperating witness, she did not publicly comment on the case. As a result of her inability to comment fully on the case, because she intended to protect the integrity of the investigation, the press had a field day with respect to her and her own reputation. It wasn't until the case went to trial in 2007 that the full story was revealed and Mrs. Joffrion was vindicated when the full facts of her cooperation, dedication and sacrifice were announced in a public forum.

In the end, suspect was convicted of bribery, and a clear message was sent to the leadership of both the business and political communities that such conduct would not be tolerated. Mrs. Joffrion, by this award, joins a very select group of awardees who exemplify the tremendous courage and sacrifice that people have shown--particularly people who have put themselves and their families' welfare at jeopardy to do the right thing to support an investigation. That is a critically important commitment--when one puts her own life and welfare directly on the line. It is only with that premise and support and cooperation that the FBI, or any law enforcement organization, can do the job it is supposed to do, which is protect the people. The U.S. Justice Organization is very delighted and pleased to welcome and to congratulate Cynthia Joffrion as a worthy recipient of the Wellington Award, and that she has our gratitude and respect for her courage and dedication.

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Jan Wharton